My Nintendo Japan is giving away Zelda: Breath of the Wild poster set

One of the biggest complaints I’ve seen for My Nintendo has been the way everything that is and has been available has been digital. Gone are the days of fun physical exclusives like 3DS sleeves and play cart cases, and instead we have… lots of wallpapers.

It looks like things are starting to change in Japan. A new award has been uploaded and it’s a trio of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild themed posters. These appear to be the first physical reward, not to mention a discounted promotion for some exclusive smartphone cases. The poster sets will be terribly familiar to Club Nintendo devotees, and at just 300 Platinum Points, they’re a steal.

That said, the delivery is not free, it costs 500 yen. Still, for what converts to around $ 5, these are fantastic. There is no sign of an American equivalent yet, but if the fact that the Japanese store is completely overcrowded with customers right now, it shows that people want real things more than themes.


Written by Ricky Berg

When he’s not writing for Nintendo Wire, Ricky is anticipating the next Kirby, Fire Emblem, or if the stars ever align, Mother 3 will be released. Until then, he’ll have the warm comforts of Super Smash Bros. to keep him alive.

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Nintendo Japan details Fire Emblem Echoes: Valentia Complete Edition

Nintendo Japan has released new details and images of its upcoming Fire Emblem Echoes: Valentia Complete Edition. While we’ve known about this Japan-exclusive set for some time, now we’ve got a first look at what’s included in the 10,980 yen (around $ 100) package. The set includes a copy of the game, a soundtrack with 30 tracks of the game, a 40 page book with title art and a Blu-ray disc with over 90 minutes of HD movies of Fire Emblem titles from the past 10 years.

Nintendo Japan has also been kind enough to share four of the tracks that will be included in the soundtrack. You can listen to them below.





It’s not yet known whether this set will arrive in North America or Europe, but stay tuned to Nintendo Wire for the latest news when it comes out!


Written by Jason Ganos

A Nintendo fan since birth, Jason is the creator of Amiibo News and editor-in-chief of Nintendo Wire. One of his life goals is to bring the latest Nintendo news to other gamers with his natural craftsmanship.

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Nintendo Japan releases new Mario Sports Superstars amiibo support information

Nintendo Japan has released new information on the upcoming Mario Sports SuperStars amiibo cards and how they work in the game.

First of all, amiibo characters, or Superstar characters, have higher stats than standard characters. Superstar characters are only available through amiibo cards and cannot be unlocked in any other way. One way to differentiate Superstars from other amiibo games is that used amiibo cards can be collected and used without the card being available at all times. There even seems to be a nice little scrapbook that shows the cards you have in your collection.

Another screenshot shows amiibo cards being used in a minigame, much like the Breakout game where a bullet is used to attack the Shy Guys at the top of the screen. Not much else is known about how the mini-games will be used to power the cards at this time.

Mario Sports Superstars launches on 3DS with a new set of Mario Sports amiibo cards on March 24. You can pre-order the game on Amazon now. The game’s launch editions include a wrapped amiibo card.


Written by Jason Ganos

A Nintendo fan since birth, Jason is the creator of Amiibo News and editor-in-chief of Nintendo Wire. One of his life goals is to bring the latest Nintendo news to other gamers with his natural craftsmanship.

Jason ganos


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Nintendo’s only Japan-only Mini Famicom lets you outdo your hipster gaming friends

Here is the Mini Famicom.

Of course, you might think you’re the hippest, coolest, and coolest guy in the game to pre-order Nintendo’s next emulation box, the Nintendo Classic Mini NES. But after you’ve invited everyone to admire the details of the Mini NES cartridge slot, served a few light drinks, and started feeling really good about your lifestyle choices, here’s your older, more bearded, always a little more. -Fashionable friend. Under his arm, just in sight, is Nintendo’s Nintendo Classic Mini: Family Computer, also known as the Mini Famicom.

Distraught you start talking about how your Mini NES comes with 30 games built in in a futile attempt to cushion the blow, but to no avail. The Mini Famicom with its exclusive games in Japan and its import-only stamp has stolen your thunder. Oh yeah, check it out and watch my friend. You were well and truly over-hipster.

And why not? Just see how more exciting the Mini Famicom is with its chintzy red finish. It even has hard-wired controllers, just like on the original Japanese Famicom which came out in 1983 (two years before its release in the US and three before its release in Europe). Much like the original, the Mini Famicom is functionally identical to the Mini NES, packed with 30 emulated versions of classic 8-bit Famicom / NES games that it spits out over a modern HDMI cable in glorious HD. Several display modes, including one that simulates old CRT screens, and save states are also part of the package.

Most exciting, however, is that the Mini Famicom’s 30-game roster is slightly different from that of the Mini NES, meaning some of them will be exclusive to the Mini Famicom. River City Ransom (which oddly got a release on the original NES in the West) is one, and Final Fantasy III is another. The latter has never been released on the NES in the West, and just like those who imported it in 1990, you will need to polish your Japanese to play it. But hey, nothing says gamer more than playing a Japanese version of a game on an imported console that you could just as easily play in English and download to your smartphone. This is real dedication.

If you’re looking to buy a Mini Famicom, it goes on sale in Japan on November 10 for 5,980 (£ 45, $ 59), plus 1,000 if you need an AC adapter. Not to mention all the relevant import and shipping costs if you are bringing one from Japan (maybe £ 20 or so).

Here is the full list of games included:

  • Donkey kong
  • Pac-Man
  • Excitbike
  • Balloon fight
  • Ice climber
  • Galaga
  • Yie Ar Kung-Fu
  • Super Mario Bros.
  • THE Legend of Zelda
  • Atlantis without Nazo
  • Gradius
  • Makai village
  • Solomon’s key
  • Metroid
  • Castlevania
  • Link’s Adventures
  • Shock sumo
  • Super Mario Bros 3
  • Ninja gaiden
  • Mega man 2
  • River City Ransom
  • Double Dragon Vengeance
  • Super Tamashito Luo
  • Final Fantasy Ⅲ
  • Dr mario
  • Nekketsu city center March Soreyuke
  • Mario Open Golf
  • Super Mario USA (Super Mario Bros. 2 in USA)
  • Kirby’s Adventure


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Nintendo Japan launches new SNES (Super Famicom)-themed 3DS XL

Last week, Nintendo announced that old-school SNES games such as Super Mario World and Donkey Kong Country will be available exclusively through Virtual Console on the New 3DS and New 3DS XL handheld systems. In Japan, there’s even more reason to be nostalgic for this 16-bit resurgence as Ninty introduces an all-new New 3DS XL designed to resemble the much-loved Super Nintendo Entertainment System (or Super Famicom as it is). been marked in the mother country).

Teasing snaps of the new laptop revealed in the Japanese edition of Nintendo Direct showed stunning retro detail on traditional gray plastic – the stuff all classic Nintendo consoles were once made of. When opening the notebook’s clamshell design, the paint job on this special edition New 3DS XL looks exactly like the Super Nintendo and features all the familiar buttons of the early ’90s console, including Start, Eject. and Reset as well as the red power indicator (all non-functional). The actual 3DS control knobs are available in the same classic colors (red, blue, green, and yellow) that were included on the original SNES pad. All the ports and buttons of the new 3DS are also where you expect them

Seeing it is instantly falling in love with it, and it’s probably our favorite of all Nintendo’s 3DS variants (and there have been plenty). But unfortunately for us here in the western world, the new Famicom-themed 3DS XL will only be available in Japan with no launch announcements elsewhere in the world. If you want to import one, it’ll set you back 21,600 yen (around £ 145) when the handheld goes on sale in April.

Also see: Nintendo Direct announces SNES games are coming to the new 3DS

Key words: 3ds, Gaming, new, nintendo, retro, SNES, Super Famicom


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Nintendo Japan announces 32gb white Wii U fast charger and wiimote

An official extended battery for its Wii U gamepad isn’t the only thing Nintendo Japan posted on its website tonight, as it also added a white option for the Wii U 32GB Premium Bundle, an edition. special 30th anniversary Luigi 3DS XL and a fast charge option for the Wiimote. Polls surfaced earlier this year suggesting a fast-charging option on the way for the Wiimote, and in Japan gamers will be able to add the accessory – consisting of a replacement battery / backplate and charging stand. , photographed after the break – starting July 13 for 4,200 yen ($ 41) and 2,625 yen ($ 26) for drums alone. This should not only allow for faster charging, but also longer battery life than Wii gamers are used to.

July 13 is the same day that the premium white Wii U will also arrive, at the same price and containing the same accessories as the existing 32GB black console. Finally, Nintendo has listed all the details of the Luigi 3DS XL Special Edition recently announced on Nintendo Direct. Of course, none of these games are the game that even Iwata admits the Wii U needs, but a few more choices can’t hurt, right?

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Nintendo Japan warns children under 6 to avoid 3DS

by John Timmer

Consumer electronics companies are betting 3D will be the next big thing, and many are heavily promoting the latest 3D TVs. But with the advent of mainstream 3-D came concerns about the effect the hardware might have on the human visual system. Although there is no evidence of harm, most of these companies have issued disclaimers warning against the use of this material by children.

Now Nintendo Japan has joined them, warning against using its upcoming Nintendo 3DS system by anyone under the age of six.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the company posted the warning on its Japanese website ahead of an event promoting the device’s release in February. According to its translation, the company warns that “For children under the age of six, looking at 3D images for a long time could have a negative impact on the growth of their eyes.”

Hopefully the track “growing their eyes” is just a bad translation. Concerns about the impact of 3D are based on the fact that apart from holograms, no system is actually capable of generating an actual 3D image. Instead, various systems work by creating the illusion of depth by carefully manipulating the information received by the human visual system. Indeed, 3-D consists of playing tricks on our ability to perceive depth.

None of this will harm the eye itself, let alone the growth it undergoes during childhood. The concern is that the parts of our visual systems that reside in the brain are adaptive; they adapt to the information we receive and can remap connections to run more efficiently on a typical input.

This is especially true in infants, as the visual system is still developing in the early stages of life. This ability to rewire our visual system on the fly is the root cause of 3D health issues. If our brain is fed a diet rich in 3-D, it might begin to adapt to process it more effectively, and this process might come at the expense of normal vision.

At present, however, no research indicates that there is anything to these concerns. The last time a 3D panic happened – and it seems to happen every few years – we did an extensive literature search and checked the articles people had reported as evidence of damage caused by the technology. Most were in other subjects, and the few relevant studies were small and involved short-term disorientation in adults.

In short, Nintendo’s warning may be reasonable and prudent, but it does not reflect a known health risk.

So far, factors other than health issues appear to be affecting 3D TV sales, and it’s probably safe to say that 3DS’s sales will also be determined by hardware, price, and its game library.

This story was written by John Timmer and originally appeared on Ars Technica.

Photo: Jim Merithew / Wired.com

See also:


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Club Nintendo Japan adds WiiWare Ultrahand game

Club Nintendo Japan reminded other Club Nintendo around the world yesterday how much better it is by adding the first game download for all members to their service. To take this, playing cards Mario Party!

Ultra-hand is a bit weird and focuses on using the holder object to sear meat on a grill; at 50 Club Nintendo points, this is one of the cheapest rewards in the service, so you get what you pay for. There is a multiplayer mode where players compete to shoot the most grilled meat in 90 seconds.

Based on an old toy originally released by Nintendo in 1966, the Ultrahand is one of those toys that you use for a few minutes as a child to grab objects slightly out of reach until you realize you have members and you can make it a lot easier. without this.

This is the first time that a Club Nintendo has offered an exclusive downloadable title for purchase. The North American Club Nintendo has given year-end Platinum members the opportunity to download Doc Louis’ Punch Out !! on WiiWare, but it cost nothing (other than collecting all those coins in the first place) and was exclusive to Platinum members. Exclusive DS carts have been made available, but nothing downloadable.

Andriasang filmed some footage of the game in all its meat-cooking glory, which you can check out below. Who knows if it will ever release from Japan, but at least Nintendo seems more willing to experiment with its downloadable games.

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Nintendo Japan announces pink, green and blue DSi

The rest of the world may still be waiting for the DSi, but Japanese buyers will soon have a choice of three more colors. Nintendo has announced pink, green and metallic blue versions of the DSi handheld, which will go on sale from March 20.

The new color versions of the DSi will be priced at 18,900 yen ($ 195), the same as the two original models. The handheld adds a larger screen and two cameras to the handheld, among other things.

Nintendo has also confirmed the availability of the DSi in other regions, as well as the color options they will have to choose from. Australia will get the console on April 2, in black and white, while Europe will follow the next day, April 3, also in black and white. Meanwhile, the United States will arrive last, on April 5, with the launch of the DSi in black and blue.

Press release:

Mobile games, “Nintendo DSi” released a new color

Nintendo Co., Ltd. (Headquarters: Minami Ward, Kyoto, President: Iwata Satoru) is a portable game machine, “Nintendo DS” as a three-shot series in November 2008 released a “Nintendo DSi” for the body color. traditional “White” “Black”, plus the new “pink” “green”, “Metallic blue” to add 3, 2009 March 20 announced that it released. Nintendo Co., Ltd. (Headquarters: Minami Ward, Kyoto, President: Iwata Satoru) is a portable game machine, “Nintendo DS” as a three-shot series in November 2008 released a “Nintendo DSi” for the body color. traditional “White” “Black”, plus the new “pink” “green”, “Metallic blue” to add 3, 2009 March 20 announced that it released.

The price is 18,900 yen (including tax) is equal to the past. The price is 18,900 yen (including tax) is equal to the past.

The “Nintendo DS” series represents total sales, at the end of last year, of 2567 million units in Japan and sold worldwide after its release in 9622 and 10,000 units, a popular video game, the most fast in all major markets in the world The machine That is, software keeps track of memory like “My DS” carries the enthusiasm to create a feature called “Nintendo DSi” to further expand the demand in increasing the number of colors, the body color, “to be owned by one person from one family,” aims to be one step closer to the ultimate goal of the broadcast. The “Nintendo DS” series represents the total sales, at the end of last year, of 2567 million units in Japan and sold worldwide after its release in 9622 and 10,000 units, a popular video game, the fastest in all major markets in the world The machine That is, software keeps track of memory like “My DS” carries the enthusiasm to create a feature called “Nintendo DSi” to further expand the demand by increasing the number of colors, the color of the body, “to be owned by one person in a family”, is intended to be one more step towards the ultimate goal of the broadcast.

(Reference) (Reference)
Nintendo DSI, which is currently sold only in Japan, and other local terms are as follows. Nintendo DSI, which is currently sold only in Japan, and other local terms are as follows.
Americas: 2009 will be released on April 5, “Black” “Blue” Americas: 2009 will be released on April 5, “Black” “Blue”
Europe: 2009 will be released on April 3, “black” “white” Europe: 2009 will be released on April 3, “black” “white”
Australia: released April 2, 2009 “black” “white” Australia: released April 2, 2009, “black” “white”


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